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With a rapidly ageing population and a lack of both diagnostic tools and effective treatments, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a growing public health and societal concern worldwide. Its impact on patients, their families and carers is devastating.
 
One sector cannot win the fight against Alzheimer’s alone. Finding ways to treat, slow or prevent the disease requires collaboration, partnership and novel approaches. This is why a number of EFPIA member companies have joined forces in the EFPIA Alzheimer’s disease Platform. The Platform’s aim is simple: 

To ensure a brighter today and tomorrow for people with Alzheimer’s disease



What is unique about Alzheimer’s disease

Prognosis for the number of people living with dementia in Europe until 2030

Today, over 11 million people in Europe are living with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, with the number expected to increase to 14 million by 2030. [1][2] In addition to the burden on patients, families and carers, there is also an immense economic impact on systems associated with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. In Europe, the societal and economic cost of Alzheimer’s disease has been estimated to increase by 43% between 2008 and 2030 to over €250bn, equivalent to the GDP of Finland.[3] This will not only have significant implications for those affected by Alzheimer’s disease and their families, but also for healthcare systems across Europe.

#WeWontRest until we find a way to slow or prevent Alzheimer's disease from robbing people of their memories, their relationships and their lives

AD progresses in stages, with a long silent phase starting before its symptoms appear. Currently approved treatments help to alleviate some of the symptoms but there are no therapies that modify the disease, reverse or slow down its effects.
 
Despite frequent setbacks in clinical trials, scientific progress is advancing rapidly and industry continues to invest in the fight against the disease. There are 135 clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease in development. These treatments have the potential to significantly reduce the burden on affected patients, their carers and healthcare systems across Europe.
 
As we learn more about the pathology of the disease and we explore innovative techniques to delay the onset & progression of the disease, #WeWontRest until we can stop Alzheimer’s disease in its tracks. You can find out more about individuals commitment to tackling Alzheimer’s disease here.
 
Taking action together to ensure a better today and tomorrow for people with Alzheimer’s diseaseTo address the growing burden of Alzheimer’s disease, a number of EFPIA member companies have joined forces. The Alzheimer’s disease Platform’s priorities are:
  1. Help raise awareness and understanding of early onset Alzheimer’s disease
  2. Accelerate the time it takes to get new AD treatments to patients
  3. Advocate for early detection in people at risk of Alzheimer’s disease, timely diagnosis and access to the best treatment and care possible
  4. Partner with experts to assess the readiness of health systems in Europe and co-create innovative solutions to key challenges in Alzheimer’s disease
No organisation can address the challenges related to Alzheimer’s disease in isolation. Patients can only benefit from advances in treatment if healthcare systems are appropriately equipped to enable patient access to innovation along the whole of the disease pathway.
 
In order to realise the scientific potential, health authorities, regulators, the scientific community, and industry need to work together toward that shared goal of access.
 
The Platform is committed to co-creating solutions with key stakeholders and agreeing on a common approach to ensure a better today and tomorrow for people with Alzheimer’s disease. We have highlighted our ideas in the paper “Taking Action Together to Ensure a Better Today and Tomorrow for People with Alzheimer’s Disease”, which outlines a number of key areas in which concrete action is necessary:
  • Patient identification and screening: correctly identifying and screening those at risk of or already living with Alzheimer’s Disease is a difficult task.
  • Outcome certainty: the slow progress of the condition means that treatments are being brought to the market whilst data are still maturing.
  • Value recognition: adequately assessing and recognising the value of innovation in treatment poses challenges to current health technology assessment (HTA) models.
  • Capacity and preparedness of healthcare systems: healthcare systems are struggling to adequately support people with Alzheimer’s Disease across the disease pathway.

No organisation can address the challenges related to Alzheimer’s disease in isolation. Thus, the Platform is committed to WORKING TOGETHER with key stakeholders to find solutions and agree on a common approach to ensure a better today and tomorrow for people with Alzheimer’s disease.



[1] Alzheimer Europe, Cost of illness and burden of dementia in Europe – Prognosis to 2030, www.alzheimer-europe.org/Research/European-Collaboration-on-Dementia/Cost-of-dementia/Prognosis-to-2030
[3] Alzheimer Europe, Cost of illness and burden of dementia in Europe – Prognosis to 2030, www.alzheimer-europe.org/Research/European-Collaboration-on-Dementia/Cost-of-dementia/Prognosis-to-2030